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Alasdair S. Roberts, political science and director of the School of Public Policy, writes about grand strategy and why he believes in today’s world it cannot be neatly divided between directing foreign policy to handle global issues and domestic policy to deal with internal political pressures. He argues for a more inclusive view that includes both aspects at the same time. 

Rebecca Hamlin, legal studies, is quoted in an article arguing that the “Red Scare” of the mid-20th century shaped the “artificial distinction between migrants and refugees.” 

Jesse H. Rhodes, political science, is interviewed for a podcast where he discusses his new book “Ballot Blocked.”  Rhodes argues that Republicans in Congress along with Republican presidential administrations since the 1960s have appeared to support the Voting Rights Act, but have used a variety of methods to undermine its intent and application.

Raymond J. La Raja, political science, is co-author of an op-ed in The New York Times where he argues that this election season is seeing an increase in the number of candidates running for public office.

Michael Meltsner, pioneering civil rights lawyer and Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law at Northeastern University School of Law, delivered the 13th annual Alfange Lecture at UMass Amherst on September 28, 2017. A copy of his lecture, entitled “Degradation Ceremonies: Constitutional and Statutory Limits of the Punishment After Punishment,” may be found here.

Paul Musgrave, political science, is co-author of a column in The Washington Post that talks about how popular culture seen in television shows and movies can affect the perceptions of the public and influence how they view the world and the political system.

Sheldon Goldman, political science, says President Donald J. Trump has been successful in getting many of his choices for federal judges approved by the U.S. Senate, but it will be more difficult to get highly controversial picks confirmed during his second year in office.

A news analysis of President Donald J. Trump’s disparaging comments about why we should stop admitting immigrants from some countries he doesn’t like includes mention of a study co-authored by Brian F. Schaffner and Tatishe M. Nteta, political science, that found that racism was a powerful predictor of whether a person was likely to vote for Trump in the 2016 election.

Jesse H. Rhodes, political science, writes a column in The Washington Post where he argues that Republicans in Congress along with Republican presidential administrations since the 1960s have appeared to support the Voting Rights Act, but have used a variety of methods to undermine its intent and application.

Sheldon Goldman, political science, says the rapid pace of U.S. Senate confirmations of federal judicial nominees is likely to continue despite a few failed nominations. 

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