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Political science doctoral candidate Ricardo Vega León has received the 2023 Fund for Latino Scholarship award from the American Political Science Association. His research interests include the intersections of the history of political thought and political economy, political theory of race and empire, and transnational politics of slavery and abolition.  (Read More, 10/9/2023)

Paul M. Collins, Jr., Professor of Legal Studies and Political Science at UMass Amherst, has a new book, Supreme Bias: Gender and Race in U.S. Supreme Court Confirmation Hearings (Stanford University Press). In addition to revealing the disturbing extent to which bias exists even at the highest echelon of U.S. legal power, the book provides concrete suggestions for reducing bias. (Stanford University Press)

​​Professor Tatishe Nteta was featured in a Politico article titled “What Taylor Swift’s ‘Eras’ Tour Tells Us About Trump’s Appeal”. Nteta suggests that Trump's ability to connect with his followers, even in the face of political losses and legal challenges, lies in his authenticity and his willingness to express sentiments that resonate with a portion of the population. He notes that Trump's charisma and refusal to conform to traditional political norms make him seem genuine to his audience. Politico (10/06/2023)

Tatishe Nteta, Provost Professor of Political Science and Director of the UMass Poll, is quoted in an article on the oldest living survivor of the Tulsa Race Massacre and the slow national movement toward reparations. The article cites a UMass poll conducted in January showing that a majority of Americans oppose cash payments for descendants of slaves. “It’s all about deservingness,” Nteta says. “It’s really informed by negative racial views and stereotypes of African Americans, and what they would do with the money.” (The Washington Post, 10/4/23; News Office release)

Jesse Rhodes, professor of political science and co-director of the UMass Poll, comments on a poll conducted by UC-Berkeley finding that most Californians oppose making cash reparations to descendants of enslaved Americans. Rhodes says, “We’ve consistently found that reparations at present do not enjoy majority support and that’s especially the case when respondents were asked about cash reparations as a form of reparations.” (Fox News, 9/18/23)

A UMass poll found that 70% of voters aged 18 to 29 in the commonwealth support the right for incarcerated people to vote. This is cited in an article covering Wednesday’s hearing in front of the Election Laws Committee as law makers work on restoring voting rights to incarcerated people.(MassLive, 9/14/23)

According to a UMass poll from June.Sixty-seven percent of respondents strongly or somewhat supported an age limit for serving in the Senate. The data was highlighted in an overview of how politicians are getting older and the phenomenon is getting more common. (FiveThirtyEight, 9/7/23)

Lauren McCarthy, Associate Professor of Legal Studies and Political Science was quoted in a Reuters Article titled ' The critics of Russia's war in Ukraine caught in jail 'carousel'’. The piece described how Russia has cracked down on criticism of the war in Ukraine. “Russian authorities aren’t dragging someone off the street and sticking them with a criminal charge,” McCarthy says. (Reuters, 9/7/23)

Paul Musgrave, Professor of Political Science, discussed his recent research on “tripwire forces” on the Power Problems podcast. Musgrave says a tripwire can refer to “a small number of forces, normally US forces, deployed somewhere in what could be a crisis situation," for "greater commitment by the country that placed those forces there.” (Foreign Policy Analysis, Volume 19, Issue 4, October 2023)

An opinion piece published by The Washington Post highlighted a 2021 and a consequent 2022 UMass Poll. The data reveals that in April 2021, just 33 percent said Biden was dishonest, but in October 2021, it was found that just 50 percent said he was dishonest. This spring, 54 percent said no when asked whether Biden is honest and trustworthy in Washington Post-ABC News polling. (The Washington Post, 2023)

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