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Professor Musgrave featured in the national news in Vox about President Trump's view of China as a threat to the U.S. and in Time article on Rex Tillerson's short-lived tenure.

Presented as a play that unfolds in seven acts, the ensuing drama provides readers with both a practical guide for how to conduct immersive participant-observation research and a sophisticated theoretical engagement with the relationship between ethnography as a research method and the operation of power.

Paul Musgrave, mentioned in CNBC, says while diplomats and political people worry that President Donald J. Trump’s willingness to exit the nuclear agreement with Iran may harm efforts to negotiate with North Korea, the two situations aren’t really equivalent. 

Paul Musgrave, political science, comments in a news analysis about why some political observers believe the atmosphere in the White House has become toxic, as evidenced by President Donald J. Trump’s public quarrels with his staff and cabinet. (Vox, MSNBC)

Rebecca E. Hamlin, political science, writes a column where she compares the immigration systems of Canada and the U.S.

“These are areas where experts disagree, and there’s a big difference in the potential impact based on how much the North Korean regime relies upon outside sources based on those estimates,” (Washington Post)

"The most straightforward research in this area looks at how views on race influenced support for Trump. One paper, published in January by political scientists Brian Schaffner, Matthew MacWilliams, and Tatishe Nteta, found that voters’ measures of sexism and racism correlated much more closely with support for Trump than economic dissatisfaction after controlling for factors like partisanship and political ideology." (Vox)

"The North Korean state has adapted through three strategies: increased reliance on hydropower, greater exploitation of its coal reserves, and simply doing without." (The Diplomat)

The Board of the Consortium of Undergraduate Law and Justice Programs has named Marie MacCune this year’s recipient of its Best Undergraduate Student Paper Award in Interdisciplinary Legal Studies. Ms. MacCune’s thesis, written under the advising of Professor Lauren McCarthy and Senior Lecturer Diane Curtis, is titled “Studying the Fathers’ Rights Movement in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.”

A column in the Daily Hampshire Gazette written by Boone Shear, anthropology, and Brennan Tierney, a UMass Amherst undergraduate.

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