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Professor Collins answers questions about “dark money” spent on Gorsuch's behalf on the radio program Background Briefing with Ian Masters.

Collins give an intriguing argument in The Washington Post reflecting on contested positives and negatives of a possible 18-year Supreme Court justice term.

Professor Collins is a guest on WBUR this week, recapping Neil Gorsuch's Supreme Court confirmation hearings. 

Professor Collins speculates questions that the Senate Judiciary Committee might ask Gorsuch on 22 News: "I think you will see questions by senators about President Trump’s attacks on judges, and how Judge Gorsuch feels about that. I think you will have some questions about the immigration ban that is currently being considered."

Professor La Raja comments on state lawmakers's slow start in the Boston Globe. La Raja seems to have an optimistic view on why lawmakers may be delaying bills. 

Tatishe M. Nteta, political science, says racial attitudes play a role in the debate over whether to pay elite college athletes.

Congratulations to Jamie Rowen who has been named a Center for Research on Families Scholar for 2017-18. CRF selected six scholars from among the colleges of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Natural Sciences and Nursing and the School of Public Health and Health Sciences. 

On March 8th, Dr. Jane Fountain delivered a keynote address at ICEGOV, an international conference on the theory and practice of electronic governance. 

Link to MSNBC video

Paul Musgrave, says while conspiracy theories used to be confined to the fringes of national political discourse, they are now becoming mainstream thanks to President Donald J. Trump’s use of them. He says this could undermine the foundations of our democracy because people get used to believing what matches their ideas rather than thinking there is an objective truth. He also notes that both political parties are now using conspiracy theories.

Link to article

How prejudice by whites may keep black college sports stars from getting paid.

 

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